top of page

A Good Olfaction Romance: Noses, Telegraphs, Christian Virtue, and Uncanny Vice in Ella Cheever Thayer’s Wired Love


A coin depicting Vespasian's magnificent nose | Image from George Janet's Nasology
A coin depicting Vespasian's magnificent nose | Image from George Janet's Nasology

“An absent nose is even more conspicuous than an eccentric one,” writes Maud Ellman in her 1960 survey of nasal symbolism in the West, titled—in an inspired nod to Freud—“Noses and Monotheism.” Ellman makes this observation in the context of rhinoplasty, a surgical art with ancient roots that’s enjoyed a resurgence since the late 19th century, and whose purpose, Ellman notes, is “not to make the nose invisible…” but rather to make it “conform to the shape associated with the dominant class.”

Want to read more?

Subscribe to thedatekeepers.com to keep reading this exclusive post.

Comments

Couldn’t Load Comments
It looks like there was a technical problem. Try reconnecting or refreshing the page.
bottom of page